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Scaling Big Data Fabrics

The size of the network might be the least interesting aspect of scaling Big Data fabrics

When people talk about Big Data, the emphasis is usually on the Big. Certainly, Big Data applications are distributed largely because the size of the data on which computations are executed warrants more than a typical application can handle. But scaling the network that provides connectivity between Big Data nodes is not just about creating massive interconnects.

In fact, the size of the network might be the least interesting aspect of scaling Big Data fabrics.

Just how big is Big Data?

Not that long ago, I asked the question: how large is a typical Big Data deployment? I was expecting, as I suspect many people are, that the Big in the title meant that the deployments would be, in a word, big. But the average Big Data deployment is actually far smaller than most people realize. I grabbed a list from HadoopWizard in an article dating back to last year.

What is remarkable about this list is just how unremarkable the sizes of the deployments are. Sure, the list is dated, and deployments have certainly gotten larger. And yes, companies like Yahoo! are pushing scaling limits. But the average deployment if you take Yahoo! out is a mere 113 nodes. Even if every node is multi-homed to two switches, this means the average deployment could be handled by 4 access switches.

Even if every deployment quadrupled, you would still only be talking about 16-access-switch deployments. When our industry talks about scaling, we usually think well beyond 16 switches.

Is scaling an issue?

So if deployments are small, does that mean scaling is a solved issue? The answer is both yes and no. If the end game is building individual networks for each Big Data application, then yes. While the web scale companies will always need more, the vast majority of customers will be well-served by the scaling limits that are around today.

But the issue with Big Data is that it isn’t really just Big Data. When we talk about Big Data, we usually ought to be using a different moniker. For most people, Big Data is less about Hadoop and more about clustered applications (at least so far as the network is concerned). By expanding the definition to clustered applications, you move past Hadoop and into clustered compute and even clustered storage environments. Anything clustered has a dependency on some kind of interconnect.

The challenge in clustered environments

The challenge of all these types of clustered environments is that their requirements vary. For Hadoop, job completion times are dominated by the compute side of things, so the network is really about providing a congestion-free interconnect that is always available. For clustered compute, latency might be more important. And for multi-tenant environments, it might be most important to isolate traffic. Whatever the application, the point is that the requirements are highly contextual.

Which brings us back to scaling.

The real issue in scaling Big Data fabrics is less about making a small interconnect larger. Networks are not going to scale along the lines of single applications (or at least they shouldn’t). The actual scaling challenge is plotting a course from a single Big Data application to an environment that hosts multiple clustered applications, each with different requirements.

This might seem dead simple, but it isn’t. When people deploy Big Data applications today, the Big part leads people to purpose-build architecture with massive data workloads in mind. In many cases, this includes building out separate networks aimed at specific workloads.

But even in the best cases, Hadoop makes use of things like rack awareness, which help provide application resilience while minimizing traffic across the network. Regardless of whether you view this as for the application or for the network, the result is that proximity and locality are built into the infrastructure. This creates interesting considerations (and potentially limitations) when expanding. If you want to grow a cluster, you can’t just use any available server in the datacenter; there are servers that are more preferable than others based solely on their physical location.

Scalability is more than scaling

Making a scalable interconnect for these types of clustered applications is more than just supporting a large (or as I mentioned previously, not so large) number of nodes. The objective for scalability is to provide a graceful path from start to finish. This means architectures need to consider not just what the ending state is but also how to get from here to there.

With Hadoop, this means that things like locality have to be an explicit consideration in architecting the interconnect. Is the right answer a bunch of cross-connects zigzagging across the datacenter? Maybe. Or it might be a different architectural approach to providing interconnect between clustered servers.

Additionally, it isn’t just about one application. Architecting for bandwidth because you have a Hadoop-y application is great, but what if the next clustered application is latency-sensitive? Or if it brings with it a set of auditing and compliance requirements more typical of HIPAA-style applications?

If the architecture doesn’t explicitly consider how to expand beyond a single application, even if it can grow to thousands of switches, it won’t really matter.

The bottom line

The punch line here is that scaling is not only about growing larger. It also means potentially growing more diverse. And if there is one thing that the Hadoop deployment numbers tell me, it’s that people are still experimenting. If you are still experimenting, how can you predict with certainty what the next 5 or 10 years will mean in terms of applications for your business? You can’t. Which means that the most important architectural objective might go well beyond the number of switches in a deployment. Scalability could be about building flexibility into you datacenter. How do you get a bunch of different purpose-built capabilities into a single, general-purpose network? Answering that might be the real key to determining how to scale Big Data fabrics.

[Today’s fun fact: It is against the law to use the Star Spangled Banner as dance music in Massachusetts. There go my party plans!]

The post Scaling Big Data fabrics appeared first on Plexxi.

More Stories By Michael Bushong

The best marketing efforts leverage deep technology understanding with a highly-approachable means of communicating. Plexxi's Vice President of Marketing Michael Bushong has acquired these skills having spent 12 years at Juniper Networks where he led product management, product strategy and product marketing organizations for Juniper's flagship operating system, Junos. Michael spent the last several years at Juniper leading their SDN efforts across both service provider and enterprise markets. Prior to Juniper, Michael spent time at database supplier Sybase, and ASIC design tool companies Synopsis and Magma Design Automation. Michael's undergraduate work at the University of California Berkeley in advanced fluid mechanics and heat transfer lend new meaning to the marketing phrase "This isn't rocket science."

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