Welcome!

Big Data Journal Authors: Roger Strukhoff, Liz McMillan, Kevin Benedict, Pat Romanski, Michael Bushong

Blog Feed Post

Massachusetts Puts a Public Face on the Cloud

Big data A recent presentation in Holyoke, Massachusetts, brought together principal players from state government, higher education, and information technology. With Gov. Deval Patrick making the official announcement, a $3 million plan was announced to architect a public cloud space for big data projects by university researchers. The state forged this cross-sector partnership because its big data industry is strong and growing, as indicated by the 2014 Mass Big Data Report. The report, which gathered survey information from over four dozen specialized companies headquartered in the state, determined that approximately 4000 jobs will be created in the industry during 2014. Granted, the figures from the report were generated by surveying 1/10 of businesses in the field and multiplying the total job numbers by 10 (in other words, it’s a loose estimate). Big data: how it’s growing & the statewide effort Big data is the assimilation and analysis of large amounts of information that are now produced in the age of computing. When performed adequately, it involves understanding the data, figuring out how best to meaningfully use it, and applying those findings to new business development. The cloud model is often used to interpret and organize large data sets, in part because of its incredible speed – faster than a supercomputer in most cases, say IU researchers. Many enterprises were initially concerned about the special security concerns of cloud computing, but adoption rates have increased as the technologies that protect the IT environments have become more sophisticated: even the US Department of Defense has used cloud computing to modernize its IT infrastructure. It also represents a massive market. In fact, some say it’s a sector that is growing too fast. In an analysis of some of the top trends in cloud computing, Eric Knorr of InfoWorld noted that “if any bubbles burst in 2014, big data will go first.” Nonetheless, that’s just a short-term prediction. Few computing experts would argue that this trend doesn’t hold enormous promises for businesses large and small. Understanding what you have from interaction with your Internet traffic, customers, and other situations could allow firms a strong innovative edge over their competition, as explained by renowned research group McKinsey & Company. Gov. Patrick noted that the real strength of the movement in the state is in the cooperation that has been achieved. The fact that private and public entities are working together so seamlessly, per his analysis, allows the state to craft strategies that rely on the strengths of each of the individual organizations involved. Massachusetts hopes to become the recognized home for the industry by continuing to invest wisely in projects that enhance its growth. It was not a mistake that the press conference unveiling the Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC) was made at the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC). The facility is a research data center that is also focused heavily on environmental sustainability. It represents a partnership between the University of Massachusetts, Northeastern University, MIT, Harvard, and Boston University. It’s designed to meet the needs of its member institutions and to (as possible) provide research services to other schools and companies. The broader tech picture for the state This public cloud project and the new report were critical components of a general plan the governor created in 2012 called the Mass Big Data Initiative. The stated mission of that overall effort is – as mentioned above – to become one of the primary locations in the United States for the development of the industry. In turn, Massachusetts hopes to become a central player in solving major problems that can be targeted by strengthening the active research community. As with any governmental spending, the initial knee-jerk reaction from taxpayers is how the money is generated. Legislation passed by the state’s Congress in 2012 – the Economic Development Bill – created a fund to foster technology and other areas of business innovation. At that time, Congress green-lighted broad efforts to grow the economy and generate job growth through special funding of collaborative projects between the public and private spheres. Like the MGHPCC facility, this new project will utilize the skills and resources provided by each of the five founding academic institutions. In terms of executive roles, Boston University will handle project management, Harvard will handle operations, Northeastern will focus on development, and MIT will foster the growth of collaborative efforts. The research for which the project will be used will be conducted by professors at all of the schools, while the hardware that makes the virtual platform possible will be stored at the Holyoke-based data center. Boston University VP Gloria Waters noted that the type of computing environment that is being created will both have a positive effect on the state’s economy and make it easier for professionals to work together on research. Most poignantly, though, she remarked that the new approach to handling data in a more integrated fashion will end up paying for itself due to the ideas it will explore and opportunities it will generate. Details of the report The report reviews and delineates current and ongoing efforts for collaborative projects between governmental, educational, and private tech organizations. It suggests that talent can be expanded in the area through efforts to grow the particular economic segment, as can jobs and the ability of citizens to quickly gather information. The document notes that the industry will more than quadruple between 2012 and 2017, reaching $48 billion worldwide. Equipment and third-party solutions will account for the largest financial chunks of that total. However, software engineered to manage and manipulate large pools of information is the specific slice of the industry that is expanding most rapidly. In Massachusetts, companies are generating applications of that sort to fill the needs of enterprises with highly sensitive data, such as banks and hospitals. The open cloud project is exciting for many of those involved in information technology, particularly companies facilitating virtual business solutions. It represents a new way for technology companies and the government to work in tandem, accelerating research and developing our regional economies via an information industry that has become increasingly global.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Solar VPS

Solar VPS lives the Parallels "Optimized Computing" vision. It has created a virtual infrastructure from client offerings, data facilities and management offices. Solar VPS works very closely with Parallels to provide the highest possible service and support to customers.

Latest Stories from Big Data Journal
Cisco on Wedesday announced its intent to acquire privately held Metacloud. Based in Pasadena, Calif., Metacloud deploys and operates private clouds for global organizations with a unique OpenStack-as-a-Service model that delivers and remotely operates production-ready private clouds in a customer's data center. Metacloud's OpenStack-based cloud platform will accelerate Cisco's strategy to build the world's largest global Intercloud, a network of clouds, together with key partners to address cu...
Technology is enabling a new approach to collecting and using data. This approach, commonly referred to as the “Internet of Things” (IoT), enables businesses to use real-time data from all sorts of things including machines, devices and sensors to make better decisions, improve customer service, and lower the risk in the creation of new revenue opportunities. In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Dave Wagstaff, Vice President and Chief Architect at BSQUARE Corporation, will discuss the real...
I write and study often on the subject of digital transformation - the digital transformation of industries, markets, products, business models, etc. In brief, digital transformation is about the impact that collected and analyzed data can have when used to enhance business processes and workflows. If Amazon knows your preferences for particular books and films based upon captured data, then they can apply analytics to predict related books and films that you may like. This improves sales. T...
IoT is still a vague buzzword for many people. In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Mike Kavis, Vice President & Principal Cloud Architect at Cloud Technology Partners, will discuss the business value of IoT that goes far beyond the general public's perception that IoT is all about wearables and home consumer services. The presentation will also discuss how IoT is perceived by investors and how venture capitalist access this space. Other topics to discuss are barriers to success, what is n...
When one expects instantaneous response from video generated on the internet, lots of invisible problems have to be overcome. In his session at 6th Big Data Expo®, Tom Paquin, EVP and Chief Technology Officer at OnLive, to discuss how to overcome these problems. A Silicon Valley veteran, Tom Paquin provides vision, expertise and leadership to the technology research and development effort at OnLive as EVP and Chief Technology Officer. With more than 20 years of management experience at lead...
BlueData aims to “democratize Big Data” with its launch of EPIC Enterprise, which it calls “the industry’s first Big Data software to enable enterprises to create a self-service cloud experience on premise.” This self-service private cloud allows enterprises to create 100-node Hadoop and Spark clusters in less than 10 minutes. The company is also offering a Community Edition via free download. We had a few questions for BlueData CEO Kumar Sreekanti about all this, and here's what he had to s...
Labor market analytics firm Wanted Analytics recently assessed the market for technology professionals and found that demand for people with proficient levels of Hadoop expertise had skyrocketed by around 33% since last year – it is true, Hadoop is hard technology to master and the labor market is not exactly flooded with an over-abundance of skilled practitioners. Hadoop has been called a foundational technology, rather than ‘just’ a database by some commentators – this almost pushes it towards...
The cloud provides an easy onramp to building and deploying Big Data solutions. Transitioning from initial deployment to large-scale, highly performant operations may not be as easy. In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Harold Hannon, Sr. Software Architect at SoftLayer, will discuss the benefits, weaknesses, and performance characteristics of public and bare metal cloud deployments that can help you make the right decisions.
Where historically app development would require developers to manage device functionality, application environment and application logic, today new platforms are emerging that are IoT focused and arm developers with cloud based connectivity and communications, development, monitoring, management and analytics tools. In her session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Seema Jethani, Director of Product Management at Basho Technologies, will explore how to rapidly prototype using IoT cloud platforms and c...
Amazon, Google and Facebook are household names in part because of their mastery of Big Data. But what about organizations without billions of dollars to spend on Big Data tools - how can they extract value from their data? Ion Stoica is co-founder and CEO of Databricks, a company working to revolutionize Big Data analysis through the Apache Spark platform. He also serves as a professor of computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. Ion previously co-founded Conviva to commercial...